• As seen in:

The Best Trait an Entrepreneur Can Have

It takes courage, grit and determination to start a successful business. It also takes a bit of blind confidence…if not a touch of madness.

Given these most common traits of entrepreneurs, they may have the tendency to develop blind spots. In short, business owners often don’t know what they don’t know.

If you’re an entrepreneur, how can you protect yourself from these blind spots?

Find out in my new 3 minute video.

Action Steps:

  1. Listen. When you talk, you’re depriving yourself of the opportunity to learn from others. Make it a point to be quiet and listen to what other people have to say.
  2. Create systems to collect employee feedback.
  3. Find a business coach. Your favorite team doesn’t go without a coach. Neither should your business.
  4. Make time for quiet time at least once a day.
  5. Please share your thoughts in the comments section on this page.

Principles:

  1. Listening and quiet time are closely related. When you let other people talk, you will find they have things to teach you. When you make time for quiet time, you’ll find the quiet has things to teach you, too.
  2. Your employees know your blind spots. They know all about your “unknown unknowns.” Listening to them will keep you from getting broadsided by the things you don’t know you don’t know.
  3. Coach > Accountability Partner. An accountability partner will default to being your friend when things get tough. A coach will get tough with you when things get tough. It’s the extra push that makes all the difference.

Outwit the Forces of Chaos. Get Your Free Action Plan.



  • Angy Ford

    I was at a conference when the speaker said something like ”the master always says thank you for the review.” I think that comment is aligned with your first step of listen. Great Info as always.

    • http://DaveCrenshaw.com/ Dave Crenshaw

      “the master always says thank you for the review.” I love this quote and concept. Thank you for sharing, Angy.

  • Suzette Trimmer

    As a true believer in the art of humility, and being an entrepreneur for over 25 years this struck such a cord in me I had to comment. For I normally leave bantering to others on the net but this time this tape deserves recognition for the straight to the point the message, it delivers. I do NOT see others like myself who display humility in front of their staff. I always have from the get go.I may own the company I made have discovered the niche in the market it is my money and lively-hood this business depends but it is my staff who I relay on to help me guide the company growth properly.Maybe because I am a woman I take to the philosophy of “it takes a village to raise a child”. But how does that really differ from the growth of a company? It takes a village to do so and the fact I am still in business after 25 years is testament to what I have heard from clients and staff. It is them I serve and why I own a service business. When I have made mistakes and I mean big ones I do not waste sleepless nights pondering or crying over the split milk I examine the intricacies of the event and thus see where at what point things went astray and learn to never repeat the same. But I want you to know that at this time the person caught up in the chaos is the person I deliver a home made apple pie to , to say “please humbly accept my apology. It works every time.Why? Because who amongst us has not made a mistake acknowledge it immediately and make restitution to the problem, regardless. I often write notes that say I humbly ask I humbly respect, there is nothing wrong with humility as so many think today. I consider it a strength for my survival and after 25 years I have just heard for the first time someone else who agrees. Way to go ! And thank you for reminding me I and not rolling over just evolving in today’s market place.
    Thank you for allowing me to express my opinion in this format and I sincerely appreciate the chance.

    • http://DaveCrenshaw.com/ Dave Crenshaw

      Thank you for the thoughtful and detailed reply, Suzette. Humility is an attribute that deserves more attention and praise in small business training.

      Congrats on making it through 25+ years! That’s a major milestone too few business owners reach!

  • Lisa Pasbjerg

    Dave-
    Excellent message and so true. Thanks for sharing it.

    • http://DaveCrenshaw.com/ Dave Crenshaw

      You’re welcome, Lisa.